Poor sexual health outcomes for sexual minority women

Sexual and reproductive health is an essential element of good health and human development.

Poor sexual health outcomes for sexual minority women

Marriageable age and Teen marriage Sexual conduct between adults and adolescents younger than the local age of consent is illegal, and in some Islamic countries any kind of sexual activity outside marriage is prohibited. In many jurisdictions, sexual intercourse between adolescents with a close age difference is not prohibited.

Introduction

Around the world, the average age-of-consent is 16, [44] but this varies from being age 12 in Angolaage 16 in Spain and Canadaand age in the United States. In some jurisdictions, the age-of-consent for homosexual acts may be different from that for heterosexual acts.

The age-of-consent in a particular jurisdiction is typically the same as the age of majority or several years younger.

Poor sexual health outcomes for sexual minority women

The age at which one can legally marry is also sometimes different from the legal age-of-consent. Sexual relations with a person under the age-of-consent are generally a criminal offense in the jurisdiction in which the act was committed, with punishments ranging from token fines to life imprisonment.

Many different terms exist for the charges laid and include statutory rapeillegal carnal knowledgeor corruption of a minor. In some cases, sexual activity with someone above the legal age-of-consent but beneath the age of majority can be punishable under laws against contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

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Theoretical Perspectives on Gendered Sexuality Social constructionist perspective[ edit ] The social constructionist perspective see social constructionism for a general definition on adolescent sexuality examines how power, culture, meaning and gender interact Poor sexual health outcomes for sexual minority women affect the sexualities of adolescents.

Those who believe in the social constructionist perspective state that the current meanings most people in our society tie to female and male sexuality are actually a social construction to keep heterosexual and privileged people in power.

Because they are girls, they believe they ought to engage in sexual behavior in order to please their boyfriends.

Poor sexual health outcomes for sexual minority women

It is specifically interested in how society's gender norms affect adolescent development, especially for girls. For example, some researchers on the topic hold the view that adolescent girls are still strongly affected by gender roles imposed on them by society and that this in turn affects their sexuality and sexual behavior.

Deborah Tolman is an advocate for this viewpoint and states that societal pressures to be "good" cause girls to pay more attention to what they think others expect of them than looking within themselves to understand their own sexuality.

Tolman states that young girls learn to objectify their own bodies and end up thinking of themselves as objects of desire.

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This causes them to often see their own bodies as others see it, which causes them to feel a sense of detachment from their bodies and their sexualities.

Tolman calls this a process of disembodiment. This process leaves young girls unassertive about their own sexual desires and needs because they focus so much on what other people expect of them rather than on what they feel inside.

This double standard occurs when others judge women for engaging in premarital sex and for embracing their sexualities, while men are rewarded for the same behavior. They were afraid of being viewed negatively for enjoying their sexuality.

Many girls were thus trying to make their own solutions like blaming their sexual behavior on something else or silencing their own desires and choosing to not engage in sexual behavior to a problem that is actually caused by power imbalances between the genders within our societies.

However, even these girls were strongly affected by societal gender roles and rarely talked about their own desires and instead talked about how "being ready" rather than experiencing desire would determine their sexual encounters. The researchers think this is because adolescent girls are taught that society views adolescent pre-marital sex in negative terms.

When they reported positive feelings, the most commonly listed one was feeling attractive. This shows how many girls objectify their own bodies and often think about this before they think of their own sexual desires and needs. Researchers believe this is because older siblings model gender roles, so girls with older siblings especially brothers may have more traditional views of what society says girls and boys should be like; girls with older brothers may believe that sexual intercourse is mostly for having children, rather than for gaining sexual pleasure.

This is when adolescents try to make sense and organize their sexual experiences so that they understand the structures and underlying motivations for their sexual behavior. Sexual self-concept affects sexual behavior for both men and women, but it also affects relationship development for women.

Their views towards relationships show that they place high importance on romance, love and intimacy. Girls who have a more negative view often say they feel self-conscious about their sexuality and view sexual encounters more negatively. The sexual self-concept of girls with more negative views are highly influenced by other people; those of girls who hold more positive views are less so.

Boys who are sexually schematic are more sexually experienced, have higher levels of sexual arousal, and are more able to experience romantic feelings. Boys who are not schematic have fewer sexual partners, a smaller range of sexual experiences and are much less likely than schematic men to be in a romantic relationship.

The boys stated they were less able to refuse or resist sex at a greater rate than the girls reported having difficulty with this. The authors state that this may be because society places so much emphasis on teaching girls how to be resistant towards sex, that boys do not learn these skills and are less able to use them when they want to say no to sex.

They also explain how society's stereotype that boys are always ready to desire sex and be aroused may contribute to the fact that many boys may not feel comfortable resisting sex, because it is something society tells them they should want.

Many boys feel lower self-esteem when they cannot attain these hyper-masculine ideals that society says they should.

Additionally, there is not much guidance on how boys should act within relationships and many boys do not know how to retain their masculinity while being authentic and reciprocating affection in their relationships. This difficult dilemma is called the double-edged sword of masculinity by some researchers.

The researchers stated that this may indicate that the more sexual experiences the adolescent girls have had, the more confidence they hold in their sexual behavior and sexuality.

Additionally, it may mean that for girls who have not yet had intercourse, they become more confident and ready to participate in an encounter for the first time.Adolescent sexuality is a stage of human development in which adolescents experience and explore sexual feelings.

Interest in sexuality intensifies during the onset of puberty, and sexuality is often a vital aspect of teenagers' lives. In humans, sexual interest may be expressed in a number of ways, such as flirting, kissing, masturbation, or having sex with a partner.

GoalImprove the health, safety, and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) vetconnexx.comewLGBT individuals encompass all races and ethnicities, religions, and social classes. Sexual orientation and gender identity questions are not asked on most national or State surveys, making it difficult to estimate the number of LGBT individuals and their health needs.

Racial and social class differences in children’s experiences with parental incarceration. By the age of 14, approximately 25 percent of African American children have experienced a parent—in most cases a father—being imprisoned for some period of time.

Sexual minority youth are also at increased risk for certain negative health outcomes. For example, young gay and bisexual males have disproportionately high rates of HIV, syphilis, and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and adolescent lesbian and bisexual females are more likely to have ever been pregnant than their heterosexual peers.

INTRO. Anxiety is a regularly occurring emotional state distinguished by anticipation of future danger, that anticipation resulting in muscle tension, devoting time and energy to prepare for the danger, cautious behaviour, and/or avoidant behavior (American Psychological Association, ).

Unintended Pregnancy in the United States. On average, U.S. women want to have two children. To accomplish that goal, a woman will spend close to three years pregnant, postpartum or attempting to become pregnant, and about three decades—more than three-quarters of her reproductive life—trying to avoid an unintended pregnancy.[]For a range of social and economic reasons, most individuals.

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